Posts Tagged ‘Africa’

A country that had one man at the helm for over 10 years, that is a period long enough to ruin a country’s institutions especially when the one presiding over is a selfish person who doesn’t respect institutions. Many nations have crumbled because their institutions have been mismanaged and misused to profit a section of the people in power leaving the minority to slave for the majority. Whenever there is an abuse and disrespect for institutions, the period that follows is a transition to restore sanity and respect bac into those institutions, there must be painful and hard decisions to be made on all sides especially from the leader of the transition after an incumbent losing power to his opponents.

There was a short moment when former of Kenya Mr Arap Moi stepped down, there was a bit of stability and concessions were made from Moi and other political leaders for a peaceful transition, but Kenyan leaders again dropped the ball on the Kenyan people. Leaders must make measured but responsible choices for all citizens. Leaders must put the country first and above all their aspirations anything less than that will sink the country into chaos or anarchy.

The 2007- 2008 Kenyan crisis went past an election mismanaged, never should any sane leader use elections as a means to create a humanitarian crisis for any nation or settle a political challenge gone bad.

Change is not when one with power loses it to his opponents but when those with power manage it well enough to accommodate everyone.

Fatoumata Jallow-Tambajang, the Opposition coalition chairperson spoke to The Guardian 

“We don’t trust him. The longer we leave him, the more possibilities he has to leave the country, to escape from the country and to even do an insurgency. He is capable. The man is capable. In Kanilai, he has bunkers. I have reliable sources that [say that] he has bunkers. I have been reliably informed that he has treasure in Kanilai, he’s sitting on treasure, on gold as they say.”

“He can’t leave. If he leaves, he’s going to escape us,” she said. “We are stopping him from leaving. We are negotiating. He said he wants to go to Kanilai. Any day he tells us he wants to go abroad, then we say no. It’s the presidential prerogative.”

The Gambia Opposition coalition and its team failed to manage their personal egos, a nation’s aspiration for change must be big enough to bring a new way of doing things for all. Change is when your persecutor sees no retribution but a country they missed and betrayed when they had power and misused it.

I have spent all my adult life advocating for a peaceful change for Uganda when the people of Kasese were massacred by the same army that we call our national army I weep for Uganda. I thought Luwero and Northern Uganda was but the last drop of blood we could spill as a country so immature in politics, but I was mistaken after all that I saw happening to the people of Kasese I fear for the future of this country. But I hope that we can end the cycle of guns ending lives for sake of one climbing at the helm. There is nothing a nation profits when it loses its own people because someone wants to be in power by means arms. The use of violence to get power is the first failure on the part of those who want to take part from those that have failed. There is no change when the one who you want out used guns to get in while you want to use the same means to get in.

We all want justice for all but when a country is going through a transition like a chance Gambia got every word must be calculated and every action double checked for the good of the nation, not for politics of the day.

“He will be prosecuted. I’m saying a year but it could be less than that, this is my personal opinion – it might have taken three months because we really want to really work fast. Jallow-Tambajang said.

Meanwhile, the Gambian President Yahya Jammeh has promoted 49 Sergeants to the rank of Captain and the military has been deployed across the country because of a recklessness of the Opposition coalition. This might take back Gambia into uncertainty and bloodshed.

There seem to be mixed signals that are coming from the Opposition Coalition which is a dangerous thing for the Gambian people the President-elect seems to be a reconciliatory man while as the leader of the coalition opposition parties is a very angry lady prepared to hide what she wants President Yahya Jammeh to face when he is out of office.

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President-Elect of Gambia Adama Barrow Photo Credit: Inger Anne Olsen.

President Adama Barrow posted on his Facebook Page calling Yahya Jammeh to accept defeat and hand over power peaceful so that the people can enjoy peace and freedom they deserve;

Let him know that leaders come and go sooner or later, I must also go. This is a fact that all of us must accept that all times and act in the supreme interest of The Gambia. I urge him to change his current position and ACCEPT the verdict of The Gambian people in good faith for the sake of The Gambia, our homeland, whose people deserve peace and freedom and prosperity.

 

 

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October 3, 2016: Uganda Police Force blocks Forum for Democratic Change Party Offices ahead of Dr Kizza Besigye return in the country. Photo by Shawn Mubiru

 

Elections are an opportunity for the citizens of the world to appreciate those that have done well in their assignments in public offices to get re-elected or punish those that have failed to deliver as promised and expected by the electorate by voting them out of those offices. Elections put the voice of the citizen at the centre of policy formulation and implementation, but as we can see the adage of power belongs to the people in every constitution around the world especially in Africa it makes no sense anymore, elections are now rituals used by incumbents to usurp power at any cost. I will concentrate on Africa because this is where I call home and the problem has threatened peaceful handover of power and has now created dictators.

Elections no longer deliver the change for the citizens on the African continent, many countries stick with strong men or dictators as you may choose to call them, these men don’t believe that there is such a time when power can peacefully be handed over from themselves to another leader that successfully challenges the things as they are. That dream has not made sense to many of these strong men. These men prefer the power of the gun to the power of the people who come with the legitimacy to lead. They have continued to claim the popular mandate of the people but their heads are still hidden behind mean faced looking men with big guns, and armoured war trucks.

The story of our continent continues on with disappointed faces because of violence that dominates the rest of the positive side of this lovely motherland, because of greed and love for power.

We seem never to understand the lessons taken during the liberation struggles of our revolutionary men and women of our continent. We have failed as people to overcome greed that has contributed to the loss of the common good. We have forgotten that togetherness in societies led to growth and development we now practice divisions among each other and we have created classes within us and this has continued to undermine the  common good.

In my country Uganda leadership seems not to make sense at all to the led, those in positions of power seek to protect themselves from the ones they lead each day. Our Parliament now is the most guarded or secured institution in our country’s history. Gone are the days when you would easily walk to Parliament to catch the plenary of men and women who loved and did put Uganda first. Our electoral management system is still questionable by the political opposition and civil society that is why we have over 100 Parliamentary electoral petitions in the Court of appeal.

The 2014 National Consultation for Free and Fair raised a number question in our electoral system and the leadership, but the proposed then were all rejected by the Museveni administration.

In February 2016 Uganda went to elections, rejected by all they did not get a clean bill of health to declared them as called free and fair elections until now. Without discussing what really happened in the Presidential elections voices from different Civil Society groups under Women’s Movement are calling on the ‘appointing authority’ to give them a seat at the table so that they can take part in the same mess. With due respect, we have a problem with the way elections, the solution cannot be a new ‘saviour’ at Electoral Commission but reforming the entire management of our electoral system and how to conduct our elections. People should hate it or fear to talk about it, we have a rigged election in between us, we have a presidential candidate who is not free in his country. We have an illegitimate government armed against the people. The problems at hand can only go away when we are free  and choose to talk about the 2016 Presidential and Parliamentary election mess. We have to audit ourselves on what took place and forge a way forward that only puts Ugandans at the centre of all discussion making.

Uganda is heavily laden with a rigged election and a regime armed against its people. The future is bleak the economy is limping, social services are at its worst and with rampant corruption and an environment in a red alert.

IFC
Investment commitments reach $5.3 billion, with projects targeting infrastructure, entrepreneurs, farmers and the health sector

Nairobi, Kenya, September 3, 2013—IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, today released details of its regional activities in Sub-Saharan Africa showing strong development impact through record volumes of investment and advisory services in for the year ending in June 2013. IFC committed a record $5.3 billion to new investments and carried out advisory services projects worth $65 million in Sub-Saharan Africa in its most recent fiscal year. IFC supported infrastructure, health, agribusiness and a range of activities in conflict affected states and helped Africa’s entrepreneurs gain access to finance.

IFC invested $3.5 billion from its own account, and mobilized $1.8 billion from other investors. In FY 2013, IFC’s supported projects that provided loans for 54,000 small and medium businesses, encouraged 13.7 million microfinance clients; and improved health and education for 360,000 people. IFC’s investments in wind power and other renewable energy reduced 667,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions.

IFC Advisory Services spending reached $65 million during the most recent fiscal year. Projects were active in 42 countries, with 126 projects, valued at $217 million over the life of the projects. During fiscal year 2013, advisory services projects improved access to lighting and education services for 1.6 million people; generated 27,000 jobs; trained entrepreneurs and connected farmers to global markets. Three public-private partnership mandates were successfully closed, helping deliver health services to 360,000 people in Lesotho and Nigeria and power to 75,000 in Liberia. (more…)